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Thread: Essential tools

  1. #1
    Automated Home Legend Paul_B's Avatar
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    Default Essential tools

    Not really specific to Idratek but what tools do you consider essential during installation?

    Mine are:
    Weicon Super No.5 wire stripper, http://www.conrad-direct.co.uk/goto.php?artikel=804037

    Cyclops Data Cable Stripper, http://www.pcwb.com/catalogue/item/MILCS001

    Bosch Cordless Angle Drill Driver GWI 10.8 Li-Ion, http://www.tooled-up.com/Product.asp?PID=140593 (Not cheap but worth every penny)

    SuperRod Super Six Cable Rod Set, http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Main_Ind...ods/index.html

    And a set of eletronics screw drivers and quality side cutters

    Paul

  2. #2
    Automated Home Legend chris_j_hunter's Avatar
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    Default Essential tools

    many thanks, good idea ...

    how about a crimper & Cat-5 stripper & RJ45 (or whatever the correct name is) plugs ?

    we were looking at :

    http://www.cablelines.co.uk/catalogu...ular_plugs.htm

    and how about cable ?

    we were thinking of buying cable & plugs & tools from the same source (AMP Netconnect, if the above) ... though it is often said all Cat-5e is the same, so it may not be necessary ... ??

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    Moderator Gumby's Avatar
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    I've found that better quality Cat-5 is smoother and easier to pull through holes.

    If you are as anal as me you use a laser line to get your joist holes all dead straight ... again makes pulling cables easier.

    I also used alarm cable as a "pull-wire" and left it in place to add cables on a route between joists over time.

  4. #4
    Automated Home Legend chris_j_hunter's Avatar
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    Default Essential tools

    >better quality Cat-5 is smoother and easier to pull through holes ...

    wonder how many cables can comfortably be pulled-through conduit ... some of ours will be 110mm drain-pipe, some will be 50mm pipe, some will be smaller than that ... rough guide I heard once is enough to half-fill the cross-sectional area ... but wouldn't be surprised if that was optimistic ... could be difficult to pull them all through at once, and snagging on cables already in-place might be an issue ... ?

    equally (and ensuring we keep to-thread), are there any tools or techniques for ensuring the pull-wire / string stays attached to the cables being pulled, especially when trying to pull several at once ... however many several can be ... some of our pulls could potentially involve a few 90deg bends, 'though we'll try to lay the cable at the same time as the conduit ... ! ??

  5. #5
    Automated Home Legend Paul_B's Avatar
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    Chris,

    I've always thought of an RJ-45 plug as generic. The ability to get a good fit and twisting into the module being more important for Cat5E standard. Although with Cat6 the RJ-45 connector can help with NEXT (Near End Cross Talk).

    David,

    Laser line blimey now that is perfection! I am usually happy with a spirit level bubble being roughly around the middle. I have thought about using circular conduit or waste pipe through the joists for easier pulling and less lifting of floorboards.

    Paul

  6. #6
    Automated Home Legend Paul_B's Avatar
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    Chris,
    are there any tools or techniques for ensuring the pull-wire / string stays attached to the cables being pulled
    Check out these little beauties, they are absolutely fantastic when pulling cables:

    SuperRod Cable Grip Triple Pack 4-15mm http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/FXSK0415.html

  7. #7
    Automated Home Legend chris_j_hunter's Avatar
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    Default Essential tools

    >SuperRod Cable Grip ...

    looks good ... we've a car tow-rope that works on the same pinciple - no knots required, just loop the rope back into itself ...

  8. #8
    Automated Home Legend Paul_B's Avatar
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    Yeah I think they maybe called Chinesse Crackers ( I remember a Star Trek Next Generation episode where Data gets a toy stuck on his fingers).

    When I started out in IT we used to have multiple drums of Cat 5 cable and then pull them all at once. It was muc quicker for cable runs but the cost would be high for a one-off residential installation

  9. #9
    Automated Home Legend chris_j_hunter's Avatar
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    Default Essential tools

    >multiple drums ...

    Idratek can be pretty economical on cable, but Cat-5 has so many other uses it seems to be laid in vast quantitiesa by some ... ie: 'could imagine having to buy several boxes anyway, so ...

    until a week or two ago, I had trouble understanding why people needed so much - especially since we don't have TV, or a BT line - but I think I'm beginning to think in terms of quite a lot, too ... eg: a spare with every Idretek cable, for future-proofing, plus two more (to some places) for HDMI (which Avrio seem to have shown could become affordable), plus another for Ethernet - so that's five where I had thought two (the first & the last) would do ... plus the main trunk lines between major hubs, for which it's easy to imagine 20+ bring needed, with a 24-way patch-panel at every end, to allow flexibility (our Node0 will likely begin life on the top-floor & end-up in the basement) ... maybe I should double the 24 to 48, for safety ... and increase the five to seven ... ?

    Fortunately our layout will be fairly efficient for cabling - ie: the stairs are in the middle of the house, with a large service-duct going up on each side, from which conduits will (soon) fan-out under floating floors at each level (three-stories) ... which at least sounds OK !

    Anyway, hence my interest in crimp tools, etc !

  10. #10
    Moderator Gumby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris_j_hunter View Post
    >better quality Cat-5 is smoother and easier to pull through holes ...

    wonder how many cables can comfortably be pulled-through conduit ... some of ours will be 110mm drain-pipe, some will be 50mm pipe, some will be smaller than that ... rough guide I heard once is enough to half-fill the cross-sectional area ... but wouldn't be surprised if that was optimistic ... could be difficult to pull them all through at once, and snagging on cables already in-place might be an issue ... ?
    What really reduces the capacity in a duct is cables twisting across each other. This is why you see professional network cabling installers pull a whole bundle direct from a wall of boxes - reduces the twists and kinks - and I think the tendency to kink or not is another attribute of quality cable.

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