Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: House Heat Wireless Radiator valve - will not open beyond 61%

  1. #1
    Automated Home Lurker
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    6

    Default House Heat Wireless Radiator valve - will not open beyond 61%

    Have just bought a number of House Heat Radiator valves and thermostats to replace Honeywell radiator thermostats and a hall thermostat.

    9 of the valves and room thermostats work just fine but with 3 the valves will not open more than 61 % even when I set the temperature to 30c.

    The 3 valves are on towel rail type rads. The old honeywell stats are listed as 1024B for the radiators that work and 1026A for the towel rads that max out at 61%.

    Anyone have any idea what is going on here ? Each towel rail rad gets hot so that isn't a practical problem. It would just feel better if the valve could open to show 99%

  2. #2
    Moderator toscal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Near Alicante Spain
    Posts
    2,010

    Default

    Only thing I can think of is it may require an adapter to work the valve properly.
    IF YOU CAN'T FIX IT WITH A HAMMER, YOU'VE GOT AN ELECTRICAL PROBLEM.
    www.casatech.eu Renovation Spain Blog

  3. #3
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25

    Default

    That sounds odd - I believe the first thing the actuators do when you attach them to the radiator is work out the correct positions for 0% and 100%.

    The actuators have quite a wide range of positions, so that they can cover all the variations in different radiator valves. When you first put batteries in, the valve opens fully. When you then fit it onto the radiator, I believe the actuator:

    1. Begins closing until it feels slight resistance from the valve pin and sets this to the 100% position
    2. Continues closing until it feels full resistance from the valve and sets this to the 0% position.
    3. Repeats the above cycle a few times to verify things.

    So my advice would be to remove the batteries from the actuator and take it off the radiator, then try and refit it?

    Russ

  4. #4
    Automated Home Lurker
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks toscal and Russell.

    I have tried taking the batteries out, resetting etc. This happens with three valves on 3 different rads.

    Housetechsolutions suggested placing a penny inside the valve but this made no difference - good or bad.

    the value is clearly working at O as no heat is allowed into the rad but stops opening at 61 to 74%. ( even at 61% the rad is very hot )

    My system is going to have to be drained in a few weeks so I will probably just replace the valves on the rads to work with the HouseHeat control.

    Can anyone let me know though ? the pin on the valve on the rad goes in and out ? when is the valve fully open ? when in or out ?

    Next step is to wire up the boiler connect. It really is a pain to have the main house stat turn off the boiler when the hall temp is reached stopping other rads from working. Setting the main stat higher simply wastes energy and produces noise from the Hal rad ( no valve)

    Still can not decide whether to leave one rad with no stat. The boiler is a new condensing one with a bypass but conflicting views mean that I will probably take this one step at a time

  5. #5
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by longview View Post
    the value is clearly working at O as no heat is allowed into the rad but stops opening at 61 to 74%. ( even at 61% the rad is very hot )
    I found the same with all of my radiators - they seem to get to full temperature when the valve is only 60 or 70% open, which makes sense as all my rads are fed off two zones, each of which is 15mm pipe. So a quarter of the internal dimension on a 15mm pipe is probably the same as the size of the valve opening when it's at 60%.

    the pin on the valve on the rad goes in and out ? when is the valve fully open ? when in or out ?
    When the pin is out, the valve is open. There's a plunger inside the valve that needs to be pushed down to seal the water flow vertically from the radiator tails.

    Still can not decide whether to leave one rad with no stat. The boiler is a new condensing one with a bypass but conflicting views mean that I will probably take this one step at a time
    My advise is do NOT use the boiler's built in bypass, instead get a bypass valve fitted. When I did my install I fitted one myself, only cost about 20 quid. I also seem to remember reading that the valve should be fitted some way from the boiler, so in my case my downstairs pipes run as a loop with the pressure valve joining the ends away from the boiler, and the radiators each plumbed into both halves of the loop.

    Russ

  6. #6
    Automated Home Lurker
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by russell_allen View Post

    My advise is do NOT use the boiler's built in bypass, instead get a bypass valve fitted. When I did my install I fitted one myself, only cost about 20 quid. I also seem to remember reading that the valve should be fitted some way from the boiler, so in my case my downstairs pipes run as a loop with the pressure valve joining the ends away from the boiler, and the radiators each plumbed into both halves of the loop.

    Russ
    Ok - will ask the plumber to do this. If I do this will I be able to have valves on all rads controlled by the Boiler connect ? when the last rad stops requesting hot water I assume that the Boiler connect cuts off the heat, with pump continues for a few mins and then stops

  7. #7
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by longview View Post
    Ok - will ask the plumber to do this. If I do this will I be able to have valves on all rads controlled by the Boiler connect ? when the last rad stops requesting hot water I assume that the Boiler connect cuts off the heat, with pump continues for a few mins and then stops
    That's right - the boiler should circulate water for a few minutes to prevent the water temperature continuing to go up in the boiler while it's cooling down.

    Re the pressure valve, if you haven't seen one, it's just like a spring-loaded version of a radiator valve that sits directly between the feed from and return to the boiler, and you can adjust the spring tension. When the water pressure goes above whatever tension you've put in the spring, it pushes open the valve and releases into the return feed to the boiler.

    When you do get your plumber to fit one, can you do me a favour and let me know where he fits it? I'm still not sure I've got mine in the best place - instinct tells me near the boiler is good, not sure where I read that it's bad.

    Thanks,

    Russ

  8. #8
    Automated Home Lurker
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    6

    Default

    russell - not sure if I have described my set up correctly. I have a Vaillant eco tech plus boiler located in my garage. The bypass is not actually in the boiler casing but about a foot below the bolier.

    anyway when I have seen my plumber - will report back.

  9. #9
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    29

    Default

    My belief is that they are pretty intelligent devices and think about how much they need to open (or close) in order to obtain the temperature you desire. The thing with radiators is that they continue to pump heat into a room even when they are fully closed - the water remaining in them is of course still hot - so the last thing you want is them to open 100%, heat the room and then close to 0% as the temperature will continue to rise beyond what you are requesting. This behavior is exactly what we are trying to avoid by buying automated controllers.

    I came to this conclusion by having the thermostats and actuators in place before I wired in my interlock - when the boiler was off (because the old timer told it to be), the actuators opened a little, waited a while, realised that the temperature wasn't rising so opened a little more, waited and kept on going like that.

    As a test, switch off your boiler and allow the thermostats to still try and control the heat. Whacking them up to 30 should open them quite a bit. Leave them a while and keep watch, when the temperature doesn't start rising, they should open a bit more, then a bit more and so on. If they never open fully then either your room is too warm already or I suspect you do have something faulty.

    Hope this helps

  10. #10
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25

    Default

    Alternately of course you could put your thermostat to "MANU", and scroll up to "ON" - I believe this should always set the actuator to 100% regardless of the measured temperature?

    Russ

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •