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Thread: Retrofitting Idratek in soon to be our house

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    Automated Home Sr Member eddr's Avatar
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    Default Retrofitting Idratek in soon to be our house

    Firstly, hello to everyone here - I think I have read every page on the Idratek site, and every post on this forum - and I think Idratek has drawn me in now, so I have a couple of things I want clearing up before 'taking the plunge'!

    Am I able to wire a Idratek module (If so, which one?) to every double plug socket on the ring mains, so in theory every double socket is controlled (but still locally switched although don't have to be)?

    Also, I have noticed in our soon to be house that theres a light downstairs by the front door, and a light at the top of the stairs. The light at the top of the stairs has a dimmer switch at the top of the stairs, but downstairs has a normal switch which is a double (one switch turns the light by the front door on and off, the other the light at the top). How would I go about changing the light at the top of the stairs to be Idratek controlled whilst also having the light at the bottom also controlled?

    Thanks in advance

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    Automated Home Legend Paul_B's Avatar
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    Welcome eddr,

    I am in the same position as you retro-fitting Idratek modules to my home. In my situation I am using DRH modules to individually switch two sockets, however this means using four patress fittings, one for a switched fuse spur, one for the DRH and two individual wall sockets, in essence I use the following guide:

    http://www.idratek.com/public/docs/g...RH_modules.pdf

    HTH

    Paul

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    Automated Home Sr Member eddr's Avatar
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    Paul,

    Thanks for replying - So you are pulling a spur off the ring mains then ?

    Is it possible to do this but not have a spur (have it 'in-line' with the ring) or is this the only way it can be done? If so, that's a shame

    If the above is the case - If Idratek did something like the SRH-002 but with 2 fused 13A relays instead, could you use this?

  4. #4
    Automated Home Guru Geps's Avatar
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    Have a look at the DRH-002 that's a SRH-002 but with two 13A relays in the same format.

    I'm 90% sure you're not allowed to connect a 10A relay to a socket as the socket implies it can deliver 13A which obviously it can't.

    EDIT: To be pedantic.....I'm also 90% sure the low voltage wiring for the Idranet in the pdf Paul posted is also now forbidden as it is outside deemed safe zones and so doesn't have the metallic, earthed, protection covering it that cables chased at that depth require. Would hate to see someone wire there house up that way and then have the BCO come round and request it is changed.
    Last edited by Geps; 22nd March 2011 at 10:38 PM.

  5. #5
    Automated Home Sr Member eddr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geps View Post
    Have a look at the DRH-002 that's a SRH-002 but with two 13A relays in the same format.

    I'm 90% sure you're not allowed to connect a 10A relay to a socket as the socket implies it can deliver 13A which obviously it can't.
    Hi Geps,

    So a DRH-002 would be fit for purpose in controlling a double socket that's on the ring mains ?

    From what I understand, a FCU has to be used if you are using a spur off the ring-mains, is that right ?

  6. #6
    Automated Home Guru Geps's Avatar
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    It's an option but you need the FCU and suitable sockets connected.


    Yes as under UK law when installing a circuit you have to have a means to isolate it from the mains, that's why there is a switch. Then you have to have over current protection, hence the fuse.

    However, you can't control a double socket, only a twin socket - a twin being made up of two singles. If you have a double socket, they have a single terminal for both sockets, so you'd have either both on or both off.

    See how much of a pain retrofitting is

  7. #7
    Automated Home Sr Member eddr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geps View Post
    It's an option but you need the FCU and suitable sockets connected.


    Yes as under UK law when installing a circuit you have to have a means to isolate it from the mains, that's why there is a switch. Then you have to have over current protection, hence the fuse.

    However, you can't control a double socket, only a twin socket - a twin being made up of two singles. If you have a double socket, they have a single terminal for both sockets, so you'd have either both on or both off.

    See how much of a pain retrofitting is
    Right, forgive me here - So...

    - You CANT control a double socket atall

    - If there is an existing double socket on the ring, I would have to put in a FCU followed by the module which would then connect to the two singles which were a double and then the ring would continue out ? I am having trouble understanding why you would not have a FCU on both sides then, as it's a ring and current could come through the other side which doesn't go through a FCU


    I am planning on re-wiring every room socket (Apart from the kitchen) and every socket is currently a double. The plan is to do it all and decorate once!

  8. #8
    Automated Home Guru Geps's Avatar
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    You CAN control a double socket, BUT both sockets in it will either be both on or both off.

    No you've misunderstood.

    The ring is the vertical line here:
    Code:
    |
    |
    |
    |-------Cable off------FCU-------Idratek Module------Socket
    |                                      |
    |                                      L ------------Socket
    |
    |
    The 'a's are just used to space it out.

    You create a fused spur off the ring main. You don't connect the modules in a big string and have ring main connections either side.

    Twin sockets require different backboxes to double sockets so you have to enlarge the openings around the sockets as well to fit the larger backboxes in.

    Hope that all makes sense?

  9. #9
    Moderator Gumby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geps View Post
    It's an option but you need the FCU and suitable sockets connected.

    Yes as under UK law when installing a circuit you have to have a means to isolate it from the mains, that's why there is a switch. Then you have to have over current protection, hence the fuse.

    However, you can't control a double socket, only a twin socket - a twin being made up of two singles. If you have a double socket, they have a single terminal for both sockets, so you'd have either both on or both off.

    See how much of a pain retrofitting is
    AIUI technically the IEE Regs are not law. The building regs do have legal force and following the IEE regs is one way of meeting building regs.

    You do have to have a means to isolate equipment. But in the case of outlets, pulling the plug is sufficient to isolate the equipment. The circuit can be isolated at the mains breaker. So the FCU can be just a fuse, it doesn't need a switch.

    In actual wiring, your two wires from your ring would be joined in one set of terminals of the FCU, so the FCU can "sit" right on the ring. The outlet side terminals are what feeds the module.

    The reason you can't switch the individual sockets of a twin outlet is that they are constructed with a common feed to both, they are not wired independantly.
    ----------------------
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  10. #10
    Moderator Gumby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geps View Post
    H

    I'm 90% sure you're not allowed to connect a 10A relay to a socket as the socket implies it can deliver 13A which obviously it can't.
    I don't think that is correct. Provided that the circuit protection is correctly rated for all components in the circuit you can use what you want. It might be inconvenient but it would be legal. If the 10A fuse in an SRH provides protection for the subsequent components then it is performing the job of the FCU.

    If your argument held you couldn't fit a 5A fuse in a power strip.
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