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Thread: Wiring a KVM

  1. #1
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Gloucester, UK
    Posts
    26

    Default Wiring a KVM

    I've started automating vairous parts of my house, and if I get a chance, I'll document it, and put some pictures up at some point in the near future.

    I've now got a slight problem with a wiring issue.

    I've installed my central node at the back of the garage. In it are a Cat5 patch panel, a Network Hub (100 meg) and a server.

    Backed onto the garage is my study (quite useful cos it's near). As part of being able to manage the server I normally use VNC, but I've now struck a problem that if the server goes wrong, I have to take it out, and take it through to my study, which isn't that easy.

    I've got a 2 Port Belkin KVM, which is normally sat on my desk (in the study). I'd like to try and wire the KVM cables through the 8 inch wall from the garage into the study, and manage the server from my desk. Not as easy as it sounds.

    The KVM cables are:
    - 2x PS2 (Keyboard and Mouse)
    - 1x 15 Pin Monitor
    - 2x Audio 2.5mm Jacks
    - 1x USB

    To get these using the cables I currently have, I would need to drill a hole about 2 inch's in diameter - which isn't easy or sightly!

    Can anyone suggest the easiest way to connect the two up?

    I'm thinking mounting some sort of plate either side of the wall, use multiple Cat5 between each plate, and go down Maplin, buy all the appropriate connectors, and wire it together.

    Has anyone ever tried this, and/or got any suggestions?

    Cheers
    Nunners

  2. #2
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Gloucester, UK
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: Wiring a KVM

    OK, I'm getting somewhere with this..

    The following is the wiring diagram for a 15Pin VGA cable:
    Pin Name Dir Description
    1 RED Red Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    2 GREEN Green Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    3 BLUE Blue Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    4 ID2 Monitor ID Bit 2
    5 GND Ground
    6 RGND Red Ground
    7 GGND Green Ground
    8 BGND Blue Ground
    9 KEY - Key (No pin)
    10 SGND Sync Ground
    11 ID0 Monitor ID Bit 0
    12 ID1 or SDA Monitor ID Bit 1
    13 HSYNC or CSYNC Horizontal Sync (or Composite Sync)
    14 VSYNC Vertical Sync
    15 ID3 or SCL Monitor ID Bit 3

    Does anyone know which ones are required? I've read that not all are needed?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Wiring a KVM

    Quote Originally Posted by Nunners
    OK, I'm getting somewhere with this..

    The following is the wiring diagram for a 15Pin VGA cable:
    Pin Name Dir Description
    1 RED Red Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    2 GREEN Green Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    3 BLUE Blue Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    4 ID2 Monitor ID Bit 2
    5 GND Ground
    6 RGND Red Ground
    7 GGND Green Ground
    8 BGND Blue Ground
    9 KEY - Key (No pin)
    10 SGND Sync Ground
    11 ID0 Monitor ID Bit 0
    12 ID1 or SDA Monitor ID Bit 1
    13 HSYNC or CSYNC Horizontal Sync (or Composite Sync)
    14 VSYNC Vertical Sync
    15 ID3 or SCL Monitor ID Bit 3

    Does anyone know which ones are required? I've read that not all are needed?
    Hi Nunners,

    I wouldnt advise using CAT5 unless you get proper CAT5 VGA Extenders as the cable is not suitable for carrying video without conversion to a balanced signal. Having said that, it would work but you would lose quality especially at higher resolutions and refresh rates common on modern graphics cards.

    You should really use 5 core Co-Ax for optimum quality or CAT5 VGA extenders.

    Minimum requirements are

    Coax 1
    1 RED Red Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    6 RGND Red Ground

    Coax 2
    2 GREEN Green Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    7 GGND Green Ground

    Coax 3
    3 BLUE Blue Video (75 ohm, 0.7 V p-p)
    8 BGND Blue Ground

    Coax 4
    13 HSYNC or CSYNC Horizontal Sync (or Composite Sync)
    5 GND Ground

    Coax 5
    14 VSYNC Vertical Sync
    10 SGND Sync Ground

    The ID bits arent needed but you will have to specify the monitor type.

    You can get away with a smaller hole than 2" diameter by drilling a couple of 1" holes side by side and chiseling or drilling out the bit between them. You should then be able to feed the plugs through the hole.

    You could also cut the plug off a VGA lead and solder a new one on but VGA connectors are a real bugger to solder neatly which is why I always try to use ready made leads.

    Buying a 25mm masonary drill will probably b the cheapest option and certainly the easiest as you are going to have to drill a hole of some sort anyway. The drill will also be useful in the future.

    Hope that helps

    Keith
    www.kat5.tv

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