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Thread: Summer Setting

  1. #21
    Automated Home Guru
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    Hi,

    Sorry to jump in, but I just saw your question and if I've understood correctly: can you use the evotouch's internal temperature sensor as the temperature sensor for your main room? Yes, definitely. Go into the Installation Menu on the controller by pressing and holding the settings button. Choose Zone configuration, select your main room zone, select Temperature Sensor and then choose Evotouch Sensor. That's it.

    Dan

  2. #22
    Automated Home Legend
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazinga View Post
    We've gone down the external sensor route for one of our bedrooms that never warmed up properly, and the DTS92 made a huge difference.
    Our main room has the evotouch controller in it, and this room is usually OK, but it's got a very high ceiling and it's south facing, so I've been using the HR92s' temperature offset to try to keep the room under control. This method does work (-2 in winter, -1 in Spring /Autumn, 0 in Summer), but it's hardly "set and forget". Can I use the internal sensor of the evotouch as the remote sensor for this zone, or do I need another DTS92 or a T87RF, etc. for this zone?
    Quote Originally Posted by DanD View Post
    Hi,

    Sorry to jump in, but I just saw your question and if I've understood correctly: can you use the evotouch's internal temperature sensor as the temperature sensor for your main room? Yes, definitely. Go into the Installation Menu on the controller by pressing and holding the settings button. Choose Zone configuration, select your main room zone, select Temperature Sensor and then choose Evotouch Sensor. That's it.

    Dan
    Indeed.

    I use the evotouch's internal sensor as the hallway sensor - not because I'm particularly fussy about my hallways temperature, quite the contrary, but because it always sits on the wall mount in the hallway and is never removed, so I might as well make use of it. I find I have to set the calibration for the built in sensor to -1 to get it to agree with other sensors, including the DTS92, but once that is done it seems quite accurate, so long as you don't hold it in your hands. (which heats it up very quickly!)

    While I'm on a roll, I find another benefit of a remote sensor is when radiators are partially obscured or covered. I'm sure I'm not the only person to hang clothes, towels etc over radiators to dry them in the winter... during my comparisons of HR92 temperature reading to coffee table or other remote sensor I realised that anything you do to reduce the convection of a radiator increases the offset between the HR92's reading and the true room reading.

    You get the most accurate reading from an HR92 when the radiator is fully exposed, eg nothing hung over it... but as you start to cover the radiator, even if you don't cover the HR92, the lack of convection through the radiator causes the sensor to heat up disproportionately as the cool air flow pulled across the floor by convection is reduced or eliminated.

    So I would find in our living room that if it was set to 21 and the radiator was uncovered, the rest of the room would eventually reach 21 with a -1 calibration in effect, however if I even just put some clothes partially over the radiator blocking most of the convection then the room would never reach the set temperature - the HR92 would cheerfully report 21 degrees and shut off the radiator but the room as measured at the coffee table would still sit stubbornly at say 18 degrees forever, and genuinely feel cold to the inhabitants.

    With a remote sensor this problem also does not occur - it doesn't matter whether the radiator is fully exposed or partially covered, the true room temperature will eventually reach and stabilise on the same temperature either way, it just takes a bit longer when the radiator is partially covered. (Assuming that it is not so covered that it can't heat the room even when the radiator is going flat out)

    Same problem with the bedroom radiator - its a pretty large dual panel dual convector that is probably oversized for the room, but if you covered it with a towel the bedroom would be several degrees colder than the HR92 reported, not so with the DTS92 measuring the room at the wall at the head of the bed away from the radiator - a towel can be left to dry on the radiator without upsetting the temperature the room would eventually settle on.
    Last edited by DBMandrake; 16th June 2016 at 05:47 PM.

  3. #23
    Automated Home Jr Member
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    Thanks for both replies. I agree that remote sensors do work much better than the HR92, but for most of the time the HR92 are good enough. I'll reconfigure our main room's sensor away from one of the HR92s to the touchpanel sometime this week.

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