Page 4 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 84

Thread: Completely new heating install, best way to configure for EvoHome?

  1. #31
    Automated Home Ninja
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDoe View Post
    Mine is set-up with all the necessary traditional zoning but not required according to Evo Home SHop.

    Once you add the rest of the radiators, will you need more than 12 zones? If so, will you then get 2 control panels?
    I'm hoping not. Our downstairs has several large rooms, many of which we leave open to each other. There's no point trying to control those separately because the heat (and cold, as I'm learning!) will move between them. So I just have a "downstairs" zone which is a multi-room zone containing 4 (soon to be 6) HR92s. Other downstairs rooms (like the study and the lounge) I do control separately and try and keep the doors closed. And upstairs, I'll do things like bundle the boys' rooms into one zone, the bathrooms into one zone, and the guest rooms into one zone.

    Hopefully, that will do the job! :-)

  2. #32
    Automated Home Legend paulockenden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    South Coast
    Posts
    1,580

    Default

    I have a large open plan downstairs, but we tend to live mainly at one of it so I have it provisioned as two zones, with a couple of degrees temperature difference between them.

    Over a few hours it does even out, but it does hold the gradient for a while. It also means that the 'used' part of the space heats up faster.

    P.

  3. #33
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,804

    Default

    Good point on closed doors vs open doors.

    One important factor with zoning is that you only really get the full benefits out of scheduling nearby rooms to different temperatures if you keep the doors CLOSED as much as possible, especially to rooms that are scheduled right off like spare rooms, otherwise they will suck the heat out of the adjacent room and cause that room's radiator to go full blast trying (and possibly failing) to meet it's target. And it can cause very strong draughts as well due to convection between the rooms.

    At certain times of the day when doors will be open between certain rooms I try not to schedule them more than about 2 degrees different from the adjacent room. For example in a morning week day when people are constantly moving between living room, hallway, bathroom, kitchen etc to get ready I have most of those rooms scheduled to 19 (except the bathroom on 22) so that one rooms radiator is not trying to heat another room and causing draughts.

    Late at night when the living room door is closed most of the time I'll let the hallway drop to 18 while the living room stays at 21, but if I tried to do that earlier in the evening when the door is open and people are passing through a lot you just get a cold draught in the living room.

    So try to keep doors closed as much as possible and think about the times when that is not feasible in your scheduling to avoid large temperature differentials between connected rooms when doors will inevitably be left open.
    Last edited by DBMandrake; 23rd January 2017 at 02:05 PM.

  4. #34
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    996

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DBMandrake View Post
    I don't know about earlier models but the Wi-Fi model won't even let you create a zone without an actuator in it if you try. And if you try to unbind existing HR92's from an already configured zone, leaving none in the zone you'll get comms errors after a few hours when the controller wonders what happened to the missing HR92(s).
    The Wi-Fi model does allow you to have a zone without an actuator. Currently I have a zone where I am using the temperature sensor of the controller itself, and there is no actuator bound to that zone. I didn't mean for it to be that way, it's just that there are no radiators where the controller is installed on the Landing, but I still wanted to know what the temperature on the Landing was. I keep the Set-point of this zone at 5C all the time.

  5. #35
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    988

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bruce_miranda View Post
    The Wi-Fi model does allow you to have a zone without an actuator. Currently I have a zone where I am using the temperature sensor of the controller itself, and there is no actuator bound to that zone. I didn't mean for it to be that way, it's just that there are no radiators where the controller is installed on the Landing, but I still wanted to know what the temperature on the Landing was. I keep the Set-point of this zone at 5C all the time.
    I recall asking this question before I installed Evohome as I was slightly concerned about going down a route that would cost me a lot to return to the status quo ante. The response that I got was that Evohome set up for one zone (that is: the whole house) would work no differently from a single zone smart thermostat. I confess that I never actually ran a test to prove if this statement was true.

  6. #36
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bruce_miranda View Post
    The Wi-Fi model does allow you to have a zone without an actuator. Currently I have a zone where I am using the temperature sensor of the controller itself, and there is no actuator bound to that zone. I didn't mean for it to be that way, it's just that there are no radiators where the controller is installed on the Landing, but I still wanted to know what the temperature on the Landing was. I keep the Set-point of this zone at 5C all the time.
    Can it call for heat from the boiler if you turn that "zone" up and all the others down though ? I suspect not, in which case it is not very useful...

  7. #37
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    996

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulockenden View Post
    I have a large open plan downstairs, but we tend to live mainly at one of it so I have it provisioned as two zones, with a couple of degrees temperature difference between them.

    Over a few hours it does even out, but it does hold the gradient for a while. It also means that the 'used' part of the space heats up faster.

    P.
    I have something similar in our Lounge where the radiator next to the couch on the side my wife sits is a different zone. It allows that radiator to be run slightly warmer and for slightly longer than the rest of the Lounge.

  8. #38
    Automated Home Ninja Mavis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    North East
    Posts
    322

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DBMandrake View Post
    Good point on closed doors vs open doors.

    One important factor with zoning is that you only really get the full benefits out of scheduling nearby rooms to different temperatures if you keep the doors CLOSED as much as possible, especially to rooms that are scheduled right off like spare rooms, otherwise they will suck the heat out of the adjacent room and cause that room's radiator to go full blast trying (and possibly failing) to meet it's target. And it can cause very strong draughts as well due to convection between the rooms.

    At certain times of the day when doors will be open between certain rooms I try not to schedule them more than about 2 degrees different from the adjacent room. For example in a morning week day when people are constantly moving between living room, hallway, bathroom, kitchen etc to get ready I have most of those rooms scheduled to 19 (except the bathroom on 22) so that one rooms radiator is not trying to heat another room and causing draughts.

    Late at night when the living room door is closed most of the time I'll let the hallway drop to 18 while the living room stays at 21, but if I tried to do that earlier in the evening when the door is open and people are passing through a lot you just get a cold draught in the living room.

    So try to keep doors closed as much as possible and think about the times when that is not feasible in your scheduling to avoid large temperature differentials between connected rooms when doors will inevitably be left open.
    Standard refrain in our house by me ... 'DOOR'

  9. #39
    Automated Home Jr Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    18

    Default

    May be a silly question, but why would one use a Wireless Digital Room Thermostat instead of a HR92 on a radiator in a room?

  10. #40
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    996

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDoe View Post
    May be a silly question, but why would one use a Wireless Digital Room Thermostat instead of a HR92 on a radiator in a room?
    many reasons actually. But it's all to do with placing the temperature sensor in the place where you want to feel the most comfortable. And 9 out of 10 times, that isn't near the radiator.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •