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Thread: Use cases for 'no optimisation' - please post

  1. #1

    Default Use cases for 'no optimisation' - please post

    Hello

    I want to capture your use cases for (or thinking to) not needing optimisation / learning

    Please post
    getconnected.honeywell.com | I work for Honeywell. Any posts I make are purely to help if I can. Any personal views expressed are my own

  2. #2
    Automated Home Guru
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    Simple really. I have no need to to get the house up to temperature at a specific time so I do not used optimised start. I work from home but the heating gets my office up to temperature before 09:00 anyway. I'm quite happy to have the heating turn off at 22:00 as I never felt it would have a big impact on gas bills. If I saw a real benefit in my situation I'd use it. I've had Evohome since the b/w version was released and I've used this way of working since then. Chris
    Last edited by chrisgare; 27th June 2017 at 12:14 PM.

  3. #3
    Automated Home Legend paulockenden's Avatar
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    From my point of view, I think the only reason to turn start or end optimisation off is when it isn't working properly in a particular zone.

    Given the fact that this is bound to happen (learning has limits, and extreme zones will break it) I think it's sensible to be able to switch it off on a zone by zone basis, like we used to be able to.

    P.

  4. #4
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    What Paul said. Continue to have the optimization but make it per zone selectable. By forcing a user to have it operate on all zones makes people like me to Turn it off altogether.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rameses View Post
    Hello

    I want to capture your use cases for (or thinking to) not needing optimisation / learning

    Please post
    Although I generally find optimal start works well for me (and therefore have it enabled) I've found optimal stop to not be desirable in more than one zone, and have had to turn it off house wide as I can't turn it off on individual zones.

    A good example is any room with other sources of heat that may push the room temporarily over target - this is misinterpreted by optimal stop. For example in a bathroom where it is scheduled to be 22 degrees in the morning, as soon as the shower goes on and the room starts warming up further from another heat source optimal stop will calculate that it can turn the zone off (as much as 30-60 minutes early!) and it will be able to "coast" down to half a degree below the set point before the end of the scheduled on time.

    However optimal stop is based on an assumption that the prevailing conditions will remain and that there are no other temporary heat sources, but it doesn't and can't know that the shower will be turned off again shortly and the window will be opened - now the room will get cold and towels won't dry because it turned the zone off perhaps 30-60 minutes early. For this one zone alone I can't use optimal stop. A kitchen is another example of a zone where temporary external heat will fool optimal stop into acting extremely early.

    Because of these kind of issues I turn optimal stop off, however there are lesser used rooms that don't have other sources of heat where I could use optimal stop to my advantage.

  6. #6
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    I gave up using it because it always came on far too soon and shut off too soon. I had let it run for several months for it to learn but it never really did. I would have thought it is easier, and perhaps more economical, that if you want your heating at a certain temperature by a certain time, then you soon learn how long it takes and adjust the switch on time. If I had wanted that it would have been a much easier solution for me. I just leave it to come on the time I want knowing the chill is off whatever room it comes on in within a few minutes. To be honest I felt it was a wasted feature.

  7. #7
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    Never used it. My livingroom (under) heating system is way too slow for any anticipating algorithm to be able to work with it. The other rooms require a sort of ad-hoc heating and in fact the heaters in those rooms will usually do so in less than five minutes. I'm really mostly hindered by the limit that exists on being able to open the main valve, meaning that if that thing just closed when I trigger a heat demand I cannot get any for at least five minutes (ten in the default setting). Which I suppose makes sense if you're after saving startup costs for firing a boiler, but I'm on city block heating so I do not have to consider such costs. The thing here is that in winter I do tend to fire up the children's bedrooms for five minutes to take the chill out just before they go to bed and it took me a while to figure out why sometimes this would not work. The problem of course being that when the main valve finally opens the radiator valves may have already reached their 'until' time and closed and so no heat ever flows into the radiator.
    Last edited by gordonb3; 27th June 2017 at 11:02 PM.

  8. #8
    Automated Home Sr Member
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    I switched it on to start with, but then after months of watching it (via own software and now Domiticz) I switched it off.
    Reason being that different rooms have 'strange' characteristics and regularly get temp overruns. Think is caused by irregular air movement via open doors and heat escaping between rooms. Learning never seem to improve things so assumed it was chasing it's tail.
    Ditto with switch off - it works on what historical (aka learning) as opposed to what is actually happening. Guess even software can't predict the future :-)

    For some rooms it worked, but not all. So off it went.

    I agree with poster above that a per zone setting would be a better option.

  9. #9
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    Where you want to control towel radiators.

  10. #10
    Automated Home Ninja Dan_Robinson's Avatar
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    My brother has disabled his because of creaking pipe work in his nearly 500 year old house.

    The rooms heat up quickly enough when the system runs so he just sets it up to turn on 10 minutes before actually getting out of bed.
    Kind Regards - Dan Robinson (Jennings Heating Ltd)

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