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Thread: Wind Direction

  1. #1
    Automated Home Legend paulockenden's Avatar
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    Default Wind Direction

    Does anyone else notice that wind direction makes a difference to the perceived temperature in their house?

    I live in a 1950s house, with cavity wall insulation and a well insulated loft. Double glazed and no draughts. We're in quite an exposed position, southerly.

    My weekend heating schedule has been running running all day, and the boiler is just ticking over from time to time, so the zones are all ut their set temperature.

    But the win is coming from the SE, as opposed to the more usual SW. And the house feel noticeably colder. I've noticed this on several occasions now - it's not just a one-off today. I also find the same with northerly winds. No basically cold rather than warm air.

    It's got to the point where I'm actually thinking of using a SmartThings script to bump up the zone temps when there's a noticeable breeze from anywhere other than the west or south-west.

    But I wondered whether others find something similar.

    To me it seems daft. The thermostats (wall in some zones, HR92s in others) are obviously seeing their set-point temps, no matter what direction the wind is blowing outside, so why should it make a difference indoors?

    P.

  2. #2
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    My thinking is that, as wind chill would apply to houses as well as people, if an exterior wall facing one direction is less well insulated than the walls facing another, then I could see the direction of the wind having an affect.

  3. #3
    Automated Home Legend paulockenden's Avatar
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    But like I said, the rooms are up to temperature as far as Evohome is concerned. They just FEEL colder.

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    Assuming the walls are losing more heat depending on the wind direction, I wonder whether you are feeling the increased air currents which makes you feel cooler (a kind of mini windchill factor?!), even if the radiators are keeping the room up to temperature? Of course, this would feel no different from a sudden external temperature drop.

  5. #5
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    I would add that when the weather has been damp amd miserable throughout the day as it has recently then it really affects your perception of being comfortable or not inside the house. So if it is cold, windy and damp then we light the wood stove! This is a noticable effect undoubtedly.

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    Could humidity play a part in our perception of warmth, for example at 21 degrees on the thermometer on a day when raining feels colder than 19 on a sunny day.
    Also a lot of people feel warmer in a colder room with a log fire than a warmer room with radiators, a lot of this I agree is in our perception of warmth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by radar2016 View Post
    Could humidity play a part in our perception of warmth, for example at 21 degrees on the thermometer on a day when raining feels colder than 19 on a sunny day.
    Also a lot of people feel warmer in a colder room with a log fire than a warmer room with radiators, a lot of this I agree is in our perception of warmth.
    That's because they are warmer - there is a lot of radiant heat from a fire so your skin temperature will be higher for the same air temperature in the room due to the infrared radiation falling directly on you. Radiator panels operate at a much lower temperature than a fire so proportionally heat the air through convection more than they heat you directly from IR radiation.

    It's the same as the difference between a cloudy and sunny day - an 18 degree day with direct sunlight falling on you feels warmer than 20 degrees and overcast, but only so long as you are in the sun of course...

    In the case of both direct sunlight and direct visibility to a fire there is a lot of infrared heating effect on your body.

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulockenden View Post
    But like I said, the rooms are up to temperature as far as Evohome is concerned. They just FEEL colder.
    All rooms feel colder or only rooms on one side of the house ?

  9. #9
    Automated Home Legend paulockenden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBMandrake View Post
    All rooms feel colder or only rooms on one side of the house ?
    Not easy to answer that, as we're fairly open-plan downstairs, and most of the 'living' rooms are on the South side of the house. But if you pushed me for an answer I'd say all rooms.
    P.

  10. #10
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    Our mid 1950s detached house has an exterior curved tiled bay between the ground floor and first floor. Like you, we used to have days where the house just didn't feel warm and that seemed to coincide with cooler weather approaching from the front of the property.

    Stripping out the old heating system involved the lifting of carpets and floorboards in the front bedroom with the bay, so as to remove all the old pipe work and the single panel curved radiator. The surprise to me was of how much of a gale was blowing between the floor & ceiling in the area of the bay, despite outward appearances of being sealed. The upshot of this experience is that although no draught was previously apparent, there must have been a very gentle and persistent ventilation of the whole property that sucked out enough heat to make make it feel uncomfortable given the right weather conditions.

    Insulating the ceiling void over the bay and front door porch has eliminated this particular problem to such a degree that the replacement twin panel radiator that I lovingly cut up, curved, welded back together and resprayed is one of the most underused radiators in the house.



    Martin.
    Last edited by blowlamp; 14th January 2018 at 01:58 PM.

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