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Thread: Anyone recognise this Radiator please

  1. #1
    Automated Home Jr Member
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    Default Anyone recognise this Radiator please

    rsz_rad.jpg

    Hi
    Anyone recognise the attached radiator picture as I would like to know make/model so I could to find out its heat output? actually its not a radiator because it pulls air through the grill then circuates the warmer air via convection

    Many thanks

    Mick
    Last edited by Mickjohn; 20th January 2018 at 03:35 PM.

  2. #2
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    I can’t answer your question but on the subject of radiators, as I am sure someone with the knowledge and expertise will be rushing in to reply, is there a type of water filled radiator that is the best to have? I have a couple that need to be replaced, installed by the original builder 20 years ago, and not really adequate to warm the room up quickly. They do the job but slowly and the lady of the house grumbles that those rooms are cold (they are not for me but one must not argue!). They are single panel radiators at present. Some advice on the most efficient/best would be appreciated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by G4RHL View Post
    Some advice on the most efficient/best would be appreciated.
    All radiators are 100% efficient. All of the heat lost by the water goes into heating the room.

    Different designs of radiator will extract more heat from the water depending on their surface area and whether they have convector fins. I am not recommending any particular supplier, but this stockist has a useful site that tabulates the available radiators and their heat output. The design output in Watts is stated on that site for a standard temperature drop of 28oC (50oF). This link is for three types of radiator with: a single panel with convector fins (type 11); a double panel with one set of convector fins (type 21); and a double panel with two sets of convector fins (one set on each panel) (type 22).

    https://www.traderadiators.com/acata...diators-1.html

    Decide how much heat you want and how much wall space you have, then you pay your money and take your choice.
    Last edited by Edinburgh2000; 23rd January 2018 at 04:00 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickjohn View Post
    rsz_rad.jpg

    Hi
    Anyone recognise the attached radiator picture as I would like to know make/model so I could to find out its heat output? actually its not a radiator because it pulls air through the grill then circuates the warmer air via convection

    Many thanks

    Mick
    My grandfather has the same radiators however they were fitted some 35+years ago and we can't remember the name of them. They were meant to be more efficient however I don't think they're any better than a standard radiator.

  5. #5
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    mtmcgavock
    Thank you for reply mine too were installed about the same time

    Mick

  6. #6
    Automated Home Guru MichaelD's Avatar
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    I just installed a radiator in a new bay window, and went for one that looked nice, which meant it is almost 3m wide, so its about 50% bigger than the room needs. My thinking is that it will warm the room really quickly, and then EvoHome will throttle it back to a setting that maintains the required temperature. That seems to be how it is working during this current cold weather.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edinburgh2000 View Post
    All radiators are 100% efficient. All of the heat lost by the water goes into heating the room.

    Different designs of radiator will extract more heat from the water depending on their surface area and whether they have convector fins. I am not recommending any particular supplier, but this stockist has a useful site that tabulates the available radiators and their heat output. The design output in Watts is stated on that site for a standard temperature drop of 28oC (50oF). This link is for three types of radiator with: a single panel with convector fins (type 11); a double panel with one set of convector fins (type 12); and a double panel with two sets of convector fins (one set on each panel) (type 22).

    https://www.traderadiators.com/acata...diators-1.html

    Decide how much heat you want and how much wall space you have, then you pay your money and take your choice.
    Thanks for this. I have followed up more research and worked out what I need in due course. At least I can get radiators of the same width as my 20 year old ones to be replaced!

  8. #8
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    My experience of over-spec'ing a radiator is that you will get temperature overshoots. Yes, it does heat up the room quicker but there is so much latent heat in the metal work and the large volume of hot water sitting in the rad that the room continues to heat-up even though the valve switches off. Caveat emptor...

    Evohome does have a pre-emptive 'learning' mode to try and stop this, but although I initially used it I found that there are just too many variables in a room to make it a long term option and switched that option off.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrB View Post
    My experience of over-spec'ing a radiator is that you will get temperature overshoots. Yes, it does heat up the room quicker but there is so much latent heat in the metal work and the large volume of hot water sitting in the rad that the room continues to heat-up even though the valve switches off. Caveat emptor...

    Evohome does have a pre-emptive 'learning' mode to try and stop this, but although I initially used it I found that there are just too many variables in a room to make it a long term option and switched that option off.
    Am not sure I see that as a problem. It is not one costing money. The valve is off but the radiator still gives out heat. That happens normally anyway, whether a radiator is over specified or not. The boiler will not be firing. The room temperature may take longer to drop if its a big radiator full of hot water but I cannot see that as an issue. Certainly not where I need better radiators.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrB View Post
    My experience of over-spec'ing a radiator is that you will get temperature overshoots. Yes, it does heat up the room quicker but there is so much latent heat in the metal work and the large volume of hot water sitting in the rad that the room continues to heat-up even though the valve switches off. Caveat emptor...

    Evohome does have a pre-emptive 'learning' mode to try and stop this, but although I initially used it I found that there are just too many variables in a room to make it a long term option and switched that option off.
    Don't confuse the optional optimal start and optimal stop modes with learning to avoid overshoots - they're not the same thing.

    Learning to avoid overshooting is done in the individual HR92's and is always enabled. Of course it can only do so much so if there is a huge thermal mass or an excessive flow temperature you will get overshoots regardless of how much it tries to adapt. (Or it may adapt, but small "mistakes" can lead to an overshoot on some occasions and not others)

    I agree that an overspeced radiator is an issue, because that zone will tend to overshoot and there isn't much you can do about it without sacrificing the performance in other zones, eg by turning the flow temperature down.

    If ALL the radiators are overspecced by a similar amount that's not a problem though - just turn the flow temperature down a bit and everything will be fine! It's when some are overspecced and some are underspeced that you will see issues...

    Quote Originally Posted by G4RHL View Post
    Am not sure I see that as a problem. It is not one costing money. The valve is off but the radiator still gives out heat. That happens normally anyway, whether a radiator is over specified or not. The boiler will not be firing.
    Umm, where do you think the energy came from to heat up that excessively large radiator to allow it to cool down more slowly after it was turned off ?

    A larger radiator with more thermal mass will give out more heat into the room after the valve is turned off than a smaller radiator, however it also required correspondingly more heat input from the boiler during the warm up phase to get it up to temperature in the first place. No free lunch here, as you seem to be implying.

    Quite the contrary - any systemic overshoots that an excessively large radiator suffers from will cost you more in gas than a smaller, more controllable radiator that can be brought up to the set point and tapered back to the correct flow with minimal overshoot past the set point.

    The ideal situation is where all your radiators are specced so that they all perform optimally at the same flow temperature so that no particular zones are either overshooting or struggling to reach the set point.

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