Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Monitoring pipe temperatures

  1. #11
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,001

    Default

    Any Wi-Fi based device is likely to eat batteries

  2. #12
    Automated Home Lurker
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    2

    Default

    What about EmonTH / EmonTX from http://www.openenergymonitor.com/ ?
    Or if bluetooth - have a look at ones from http://inode.pl

  3. #13
    Automated Home Sr Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Edinburgh2000 View Post
    I've used one of these:
    https://us.grundfos.com/products/fin...uct/up-10.html

    It has a pipe temperature sensor on the end of a ribbon cable which you strap onto the pipe. The Auto version is very clever at running only when it needs to. It also learns over a seven day period your hot water usage and so pre-empts the need to warm up your pipework.

    I know I sound like a salesman for Grundfos - which I promise you I am not - but I was very pleasantly surprised how well this works. I had thought I would need a timer and some clever temperature sensing kit on my pipes but I don't need any of that.
    That's interesting. I have a UPS15-50N for DHW circulation, running from a timer, but it's noisy so I've been wondering about building a pipestat from an HR92 and controlling the pump with a BDR91 so it is only on when needed, but the "Grundfos COMFORT PM AUTO" might be a better solution. Is it quiet?
    The documentation shows the temperature sensor fitted close to the flow outlet of the DHW cylinder, but I would have fitted it on the return - please can someone explain.
    Last edited by DorrisMancer; 8th June 2018 at 02:35 PM. Reason: Grammar

  4. #14
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,001

    Default

    I guess you do what you want. But the use case for such a temperature sensing pump must be to work out to run a pump only if there is demand for HW from a Tap.

  5. #15
    Automated Home Guru
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    123

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DorrisMancer View Post
    Is it quiet? The documentation shows the temperature sensor fitted close to the flow outlet of the DHW cylinder, but I would have fitted it on the return - please can someone explain.
    Yes, the pump is extremely quiet.

    The documentation is quite helpful and can be sourced here:
    http://net.grundfos.com/Appl/ccmsser...re-5235655.pdf

    There is also the two page brochure which gives an overview but does not explain the technical operation in any detail.

    Essentially, the pump is fitted on the return leg close to your DHW tank and has an inbuilt temperature sensor. The ribbon cable has another temperature sensor which you strap onto the outlet pipe from your cylinder, so that the pump knows both the flow and the return temperatures. You can then operate it in one of three modes:

    1) Continuous (i.e. the pump just runs all the time);

    2) Temperature control mode "...With temperature operation, the maximum temperature measured at both of the sensors is stored and the pump automatically adapts and calculates the gap between Tstop and Tstart. The pump switches on when one of the sensors has a lower temperature than Tstart. The pump switches off when the Tstop temperature range is exceeded on both sensors."

    3) The "AutoAdapt" mode: The sensor on the ribbon cable .. "and the temperature sensor incorporated in the pump are used to detect when hot water is tapped. The detected tapping events are logged and used to predict the consumption pattern. The AutoAdapt function automatically controls the on/off behaviour of the pump according to this pattern. .................The pump needs two weeks to adapt when hot water is tapped. This means that the pump starts up in temperature mode [for] the first two weeks even if you have selected AutoAdapt."

    The pump assumes that usage is repeated weekly and uses the first two weeks of data to learn when you use the hot water in your house. It then warms up the pipework just before you need it.
    Last edited by Edinburgh2000; 8th June 2018 at 03:16 PM.

  6. #16
    Automated Home Sr Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Thanks for the info and link to the PDF, I'd found other docs but nothing as detailed as that one. I hadn't realised there was an internal T sensor as well as the external one, so now I understand.

  7. #17
    Automated Home Ninja
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bruce_miranda View Post
    I guess you do what you want. But the use case for such a temperature sensing pump must be to work out to run a pump only if there is demand for HW from a Tap.
    I intend to use something like this when I upgrade our hot water to have secondary return - i.e. continuous circulation. The idea here is that it doesn't need to be on all the time - once there's hot water in the pipe, the pump can turn off until the water in the pipe cools down again at which time the pump can come back on to get the pipe hot again.

  8. #18
    Automated Home Lurker
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Bacau, Romania
    Posts
    3

    Default

    If you can route a phone or cat5 cable to the points of interest, would second smar's mysensors suggestion.
    I don't have pipes to monitor but room temperatures, currently 12 locations with DS18B20s on phone plugs, all connected via a single cat5e cable routed through the loft space, connected to a single pro mini with rfm69 banging only changes back to Domoticz every 5 minutes. Been running reliably since last December, but is USB powered with a battery standby. No idea of power usage on battery alone, but no reason you couldn't set up multiple nodes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •