Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Long Narrow Living Room in old house

  1. #1
    Automated Home Sr Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Hampshire, Great Britain
    Posts
    79

    Default Long Narrow Living Room in old house

    My Evohome kit was installed some years ago by a local plumber & it was his first installation. Generally things have worked well, however I have one problem.

    My home was originally three cottages, the earliest 16th century with 19th & 20th century additions, some double glazing, most walls solid etc...

    The living room is 3.5m x 9.5m with two sash windows & a door into the garden on the long side, all single glazed. There are two HR92 controlled radiators one on each elevation, and for some reason, which I forget, when Evohome was installed the living room was configured as two zones East & West. I am using the maximum twelve devices connected to my Evohome Controller, and would like to merge the two zones in the living room into a single zone, and then utilise the freed up zone elsewhere in the house. A few questions:-

    Why might the living room have been configured as two zones?

    If reconfiguring as a single zone how should I proceed? Would it be sensible to have a Honeywell DTS92E1020 Wireless Digital Room Thermostat (DTS92) in a mid-point in the room?

    Thanks in advance.

    FB
    Last edited by FullBore; 28th October 2019 at 09:17 AM.

  2. #2
    Automated Home Sr Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Hampshire, Great Britain
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Bump !

    Can anyone help please?

    FB

  3. #3
    Automated Home Sr Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Hello, If I am correct you can configure the stuff from 3 different ways :

    1. Configure 1 HR92 for 1 room
    2. Configure 2 HR92's being in the same room and control them as if they were 1
    3. there is also a simple / multilane way you can confirgure the HR92's but I do not recall what that is.

    for me, every room has 1 HR92 (configured as simple, not multi), except the living room where I have 2 radiators, each with 1 HR92 (also configured as simple, not multi), but where those 2 HR92's are "linked " to each other and working together. So whenever I ask for example 25 degrees to the living, both HR92's are opening to get 25 degrees.
    When configuring the HR92 if I am correct, it asks which zone it needs to be connected to ... in tis case when configuring the 2 HR92s from the same room you link them to the same zone.

  4. #4
    Automated Home Sr Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    85

    Default

    I have a long thin room configured as 2 zones, but that is only because once end is sort of my office and the other end is the living room... so I spend most of the day at one end, and then evening as the other end. It just offers finer control and is probably not the way it should be done but it suits my needs.
    I'm trying to remember how Honeywell works, but I think for each zone it just reads the temperature from one of the HR92s (or separate thermometer) which could result in one side of the room being hotter then the other.

  5. #5
    Automated Home Legend
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,845

    Default

    What you describe is a "single room zone" - one nominated temperature sensor in the zone controls all radiators, whether it be a wall sensor or the first HR92 bound, with the other HR92's acting as slaves.

    However in your scenario of long skinny room you could use a "multi-room zone" that contains both radiators. In this mode external temperature sensors are not used and every HR92 in the zone uses its own inbuilt temperature sensor, whilst still sharing the common scheduled set point of the zone.

    This is intended for radiators in different rooms that follow the same schedules but need to measure their temperature independently (like bedrooms) but can be "abused" with radiators in the same room in the case where the thermal characteristics of one part of the room differs greatly from another part of the room. Another example would be grouping together a downstairs and upstairs hallway radiator which are technically in the same room but subject to different thermal characteristics due to the elevation difference.
    Last edited by DBMandrake; 31st October 2019 at 09:59 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •