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Thread: ATF600 wall mount questions

  1. #1
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    Default ATF600 wall mount questions

    Has anyone noted a reduction in range when using the controller on an ATF600 wall mount (with the power supply in a metal back box) compared to when free-standing?
    I'm wondering whether it's worth having the power supply somewhere slightly remote and using a non-metallic back box.

    What do you typically use for circuit protection with the wall mount - a fuse connection unit, feed it directly from the (6A) lighting circuit, or something else? I wish Honeywell had integrated a fuse holder into the backplate - easy at the design stage but a bit of a pain to add later.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by DorrisMancer View Post
    Has anyone noted a reduction in range when using the controller on an ATF600 wall mount (with the power supply in a metal back box) compared to when free-standing?
    I'm wondering whether it's worth having the power supply somewhere slightly remote and using a non-metallic back box.

    What do you typically use for circuit protection with the wall mount - a fuse connection unit, feed it directly from the (6A) lighting circuit, or something else? I wish Honeywell had integrated a fuse holder into the backplate - easy at the design stage but a bit of a pain to add later.
    I usually locate the transformer remotely, and just use the twin and earth to supply 12v to the backplate. Usually stick the transformer in the airing cupboard or something with the wiring centre.

  3. #3
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    I've got 2 controllers. One is fitted where the old thermostat was, with mains fed down the old cable from the wiring centre (which is in a boiler room), but the other is on the landing and currently plugged-in to a 13A socket. It would be very disruptive to run a cable from the landing to the wiring centre, hence the desire to power it from a spur. The cable runs would both be too long to mount the transformers in the wiring centre.
    BTW, I think you've got a typo: the voltage is just under 5, rather than 12.

  4. #4
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    I mount the ATF600 flat onto a plaster and brick wall with the transformer located remotely, with just wires (carrying the 5v DC) coming through a small hole.

    If you put a steel back box behind the controller it is very likely to have an impact on wireless range. If you don't want to move the transformer one option might be to replace the metal back box with a plastic one.

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    I think the only viable ways to provide fuse protection for the PSU is either a non-replaceable in-line fuse in the back box or a remote fused spur. The advantage of the latter is that the PSU could live in the back box for the fused spur.
    Presumably your PSU is fed from the heating wiring centre(?)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtmcgavock View Post
    I usually locate the transformer remotely, and just use the twin and earth to supply 12v to the backplate. Usually stick the transformer in the airing cupboard or something with the wiring centre.
    Sorry yes, I meant 5v. TBH i've never really paid much attention to the voltage of the controller

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DorrisMancer View Post
    I think the only viable ways to provide fuse protection for the PSU is either a non-replaceable in-line fuse in the back box or a remote fused spur. The advantage of the latter is that the PSU could live in the back box for the fused spur.
    Presumably your PSU is fed from the heating wiring centre(?)
    Yes. I actually managed to squeeze the transformer neatly into an empty corner of the wiring centre box. So it runs from the same 3a fused switch which supplies the wiring centre and therefore boiler and BDR91's.

    This worked well because there was already a cable running from the wiring centre vicinity to the original thermostat which the Evohome and wall mount replaced. Except now it is carrying 5v DC instead of 240v AC.

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