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Thread: Batteries for HR92s now Duracell Industrial batteries have been discontinued

  1. #11
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    I’ve been using low self discharge NiMH batteries for years with the HR92 without issues. I didn’t know there was a specific NiMH setting, I’ve just had them set up as default. The only issue I’ve noticed is that the battery charge level shows as 2 bars instead of 3 bars when the batteries are fully charged, but they still typically last many months. In fact I’m still using a load of several years old Uniross low self discharge nimh batteries - when my children were young I bought dozens for their toys, which are now spare. I occasionally run a test cycle in the Technoline charger and dispose of any with significantly reduced capacity. More recently I have bought either Fujitsu or Panasonic low self discharge nimh batteries which seem just as good as uniross were, and I think the capacity is slightly higher. For anyone who has used NiMH that aren’t low self discharge, you’ll find they’re a waste of time because they lose significant charge after a few months even if not being used, so totally unsuitable for something like the HR92 where the power draw is low and the aim is to charge them infrequently.

    I’ve been buying them from battery logic for years. The charger (technoline) they sell is really good too, any batteries that have been unused for a while can be put through a refresh cycle that also tests their capacity. If refresh fails to restore decent capacity (in a very old battery) then I throw it away.

    I bought the evohome system because it’s more environmentally friendly - minimising energy use in rooms when it’s not needed. I wouldn’t be happy using disposable batteries. The other thing I had issues with for disposable batteries is the dramatically higher incidence of leakage - I’ve had several devices ruined by leaked batteries (thankfully not the hr92’s), decent brands such as Ducacell, including the industrial ones, Panasonic etc all leak, especially in devices that are used infrequently like torches. I’ve had lots of disposable batteries leak that are still in date. Out of dozens of low self discharge nimh batteries I threw away one single battery because I thought it might have been starting to leak, but it was subtle unlike the complete mess that disposable batteries cause.

    I’m not sure how long exactly I get in the hr92, but I suspect it’s 12 months, possibly longer especially in some rooms if feels like I rarely need to change them.

    Although the voltage is different for nimh batteries, it’s rare for this to cause issues in use - apparently the voltage of a disposable battery drops MORE as soon as a current is drawn, so the voltage rating of a battery (when there is no current draw) is very misleading when comparing 1,5v disposable vs 1.2v nimh. I would strongly recommend everyone tries them.
    Last edited by Bilbomacuser; 9th January 2021 at 10:10 AM.

  2. #12
    Automated Home Sr Member philchillbill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBMandrake View Post
    All I see in that article is that Ikea plan to stop selling virtually all non-rechargeable batteries (not just Alkaline) over "environmental concerns".

    So just buy from somewhere other than Ikea... When buying in bulk from places like battery station is so much cheaper I don't know why you would buy them from Ikea anyway.

    For a moment there you had me thinking there might be some legislation coming in like that "banning" household filament bulbs, but no.

    The real answer to waste disposal concerns with non-rechargeable batteries is to provide easy to access disposal options for recycling. Here in the UK you occasionally see corner stores with a place to dispose of used cells, but it can be hard to find locations like this so I'm sure most end up in landfill via general household waste as people don't know what else to do with them. That's a problem that could be addressed as they can and should be recycled.
    Correct, but if IKEA thinks this is a good idea then other will follow. When Apple introduced white earbuds, we suddenly all had white earbuds. When they introduced the notch, all phones adopted notches. IKEA are the biggest retailer of batteries in the world. So sure, it's not legislation, but it may become a trend nevertheless.

    For the record, every supermarket in NL has battery disposal banks as you enter the store. But even then, rechargeable is more environmentally friendly than recycling.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bilbomacuser View Post
    I’ve been buying them from battery logic for years. The charger (technoline) they sell is really good too,.
    I can also recommend Battery Logic - good service - and the Technoline charger. I used one for a few years until I connected it to the wrong power supply

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by philchillbill View Post
    For the record, every supermarket in NL has battery disposal banks as you enter the store.
    Same in the UK. Also, our local 'recycling centre' - AKA the tip - has a battery disposal point. I'm sure most do these days.

  5. #15
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    Haven't used rechargeable batteries for way over ten years now. They always turned out to be a disappointment, the spare set I brought to be able to continue being just as empty as the ones they needed to replace. Even happened with Duracells, like they have a timer that says stop working X minutes after charging regardless of (any) load.

    As for NL, we have this show on television that investigates claims about consumer products and there was an episode on whether known brand batteries are really better than no-name batteries. It turned out that most batteries are in fact produced in the same factory, even those from known brands. Which sort of confirms what I found myself, as I have one of my HR92 units running on a set of ARO (home brand of MAKRO wholesale stores) batteries for over two years now. Granted, the motor on that HR92 is rarely activated, but at a quarter to a third of the price of a known brand like Varta, Kodak, Philips, etc. I'd name that good economy.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gordonb3 View Post
    Haven't used rechargeable batteries for way over ten years now. They always turned out to be a disappointment, the spare set I brought to be able to continue being just as empty as the ones they needed to replace. Even happened with Duracells, like they have a timer that says stop working X minutes after charging regardless of (any) load.
    That doesn't happen with the NiMH "Low Self Discharge" type. I keep them for months after charging and they're still good. Same with power tools, I used to have to put my drill on charge the day before I wanted to use it. With the modern rechargeable (lithium, in this case,I think), it's always ready to use.
    Last edited by filbert; 10th January 2021 at 12:12 PM.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by filbert View Post
    That doesn't happen with the NiMH "Low Self Discharge" type. I keep them for months after charging and they're still good. Same with power tools, I used to have to put my drill on charge the day before I wanted to use it. With the modern rechargeable (lithium, in this case,I think), it's always ready to use.
    I've just had to scrap a HR92, due to a leaky alkaline. Completely dead, even after I tried to clean the contacts. So, I'm done with alkalines. These were Amazon own brand, which claim to be leak proof, but clearly not.

    I'm switching to low self discharge NIMH, as I don't want to have to fork out for more HR92s. Even if I do have to replace them more often, I'll just have to put up with that.
    Last edited by IvanOpinion; 17th May 2021 at 04:22 PM.

  8. #18
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    One thing I would recommend for NiMH low self discharge batteries is a decent charger. The one I have has test modes and refresh modes so that if you have any batteries spare sitting around for very long periods (such as when we ended up with a surplus when my children grew out of their toys) you can test that the capacity is what it should be, and if it isnít then put it through the refresh cycle. Often this will bring them back almost like new. I still have some several years old that have their original 2400 mAh capacity.

    Iíve had so many alkaline batteries leak over the years that I avoid them wherever possible. Iíve recently bought a load of Fujitsu AAA batteries for torches like the Led Lenser P7 to avoid the risk of battery leaks.
    Last edited by Bilbomacuser; 17th May 2021 at 08:55 PM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bilbomacuser View Post
    One thing I would recommend for NiMH low self discharge batteries is a decent charger. The one I have has test modes and refresh modes so that if you have any batteries spare sitting around for very long periods (such as when we ended up with a surplus when my children grew out of their toys) you can test that the capacity is what it should be, and if it isn’t then put it through the refresh cycle. Often this will bring them back almost like new. I still have some several years old that have their original 2400 mAh capacity.
    I agree, although I also find that sometimes my Technoline charger rejects certain batteries if they are completely drained (eg, all their charge is used and then they sit in that state and self-discharge even further). In that case, I put them in a 'dumb' charger for 10 minutes, which just starts charging them regardless of their state. This seems to nudge them back into life (I think of it like a defibrillator) and then the smart charger is able to detect them. A refresh then does its magic.

  10. #20
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    The first Technoline charger I had didnít charge completely drained batteries unless you used a paper clip to link the terminals of an adjacent charging battery for several seconds to Ďkick startí it.

    However the newer version of the Technoline charger doesnít have this problem thankfully. Even batteries with voltages as low as 0.8V charge fine (though often would need a refresh cycle to get the capacity back up - as usually batteryís that are that flat have become so from being left discharged for a long time).

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