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Thread: CAT5e - Ethernet, BT Telephone Wiring - HELP!

  1. #11
    Automated Home Lurker
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    Default Re: CAT5e - Ethernet, BT Telephone Wiring - HELP!

    Bhav - in reply to your question "What's a patch panel" - quite simply, you'll probably have a lot more sockets put in than you need ("flood wiring"). All of these sockets get taken back to one point - a cupboard somewhere. You open the cupboard and find forty twised cables - yeuch!

    The solution is a patch panel. You attach all the cables (in the cupbard) to the back of the patch panel. At the front are forty sockets. Let's say you want to make socket number four a connection to the internet - you connect a UTP / Cat5 cable from your Internet router / hub to socket 4 on the patch panel - this now means the hub is connected to socket 4. Let's say that some time later you want to make socket 5 (not socket 4) "live" - you unplug the cable at the patch panel that's attached to socket 4 and place it in socket 5. Want to make socket 6 a phone point? Plug your BT line into socket 6 on the patch panel and then use a mod-tap adapter (www.blackbox.co.uk used to do them, try seraching on the net) which plugs into your socket 6 (wherever socket 6 is in the house), and your telephone plugs into the adapter.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: CAT5e - Ethernet, BT Telephone Wiring - HELP!

    Oh, a couple of other thoughts

    1) Use solid core for the cable runs from sockets to the panel, but stranded (flexible) stuff for the patch leads from hub to patch panel. The solid core is much better and more robust in a permanent install whereas it's too brittle to use for patch cables.

    2) Consider running redundnant cables in the walls. Perhaps run two runs to every socket, If a cable fractures during install or fails later you can simply use the other cable. Small initial extra cost for loads of savings later (no need to rip the walls apart!)

    3) Run more sockets than you need! Seriously - biggest mistake someone can make is not putting enough sockets in!

    4) Consider using higher grade Cable than Cat5e - with gigabit ethernet around the corner and who-knows-what for home automation / AV, use Cat6 or Cat7cable if you can afford it. There is practically no diference in Cat5 and Cat5e (infact Cat5 cables IS Cat5e cable, just not specified as such. Both have the same spectral bandwidth but Cat5e has some additional specifications). Also consider getting a Cat6 Patch panel - but if the price is huge don't bother - it's easy to change a patch panel (as opposed to having reqire the house).

    5) NEVER use shieded cable (STP), ALWAYS use UNSHIELDED cable (UTP). The shielding causing electrical interference between the cables to be trapped, bouncing it around and causing interference. STP is only ever used for specific applications.

    Hope this helps!

    Steve

  3. #13
    Automated Home Legend TimH's Avatar
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    Default Re: CAT5e - Ethernet, BT Telephone Wiring - HELP!

    I agree with the general sentiments but I did want to clarify a couple of things.

    Quote Originally Posted by fogster
    2) Consider running redundnant cables in the walls. Perhaps run two runs to every socket...
    and:
    3) Run more sockets than you need! Seriously - biggest mistake someone can make is not putting enough sockets in!
    I'd recommend even more than that :-) It's easy to run at first fix and you don't have to terminate it all straight away, you can leave it in the patress ready for later use. I've done this in a number of places and it's a much better proposition than trying to run more cable later.

    Quote Originally Posted by fogster
    4) Consider using higher grade Cable than Cat5e - with gigabit ethernet around the corner and who-knows-what for home automation / AV, use Cat6 or Cat7cable if you can afford it.
    Gigabit Ethernet is already here and runs over Cat5e :-)
    e.g. Netgear GS605 5 Port 10/100/1000 Gigabit UnManaged Switch for 23+vat (http://tinyurl.com/m36dy)

    The specs for installing and terminating Cat6/7 cable are much higher and it no longer becomes DIY job (unless you are a cable-monkey by trade...). Poorly terminated Cat6 will perform worse than Cat5 plus the Cat6 hardware (faceplates, patch panels etc.) cost significantly more than their Cat5 equivalents.

    Quote Originally Posted by fogster
    There is practically no diference in Cat5 and Cat5e (infact Cat5 cables IS Cat5e cable, just not specified as such...
    There is a subtle difference between the two cable types and that is the twist ratio. Cat5e improves the crosstalk (i.e. lowers it) by varying the twist ratio between the pairs.
    http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/f...fferences.html

    As a result the cable length of each pair, for a given length of overall cable, is not the same. This doesn't make a difference for networking, but certain high-end A/V over Cat5 products specifically state Cat5 should be used to avoid the signals arriving at different times at the remote end of the cable and upsetting the picture.

    HTH,

    Tim.

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